We Sign @Brochenski

Over the weekend Chris aka @Brochenski agreed to come on board and contribute to the site. Beyond his good guy status, Chris is also a great blogger as his past works can attest:

On Condra

During his time in the AHL Condra shot 8.9%, while the league average was around 9.4%. So right away we know he’ll most likely never shoot above average in the NHL (big surprise, huh?). One interesting thing to point out about his AHL stats is that in 09-10 he shot an underwhelming 6.9%, and then the next season he rebounded with an above-average 11.1%. By the looks of it, he carried that high S% into the NHL with him, shooting 12.5%. So let’s look at his S% as a whole in his pro career, shall we? He shot below-average in 09-10, above-average in 10-11, and below-average in 11-12. Ya know what? I think I spot a pattern. Odds are that butt-ugly 5.7% will rebound to a more realistic number in 12-13.

On Karlsson

The thing I didn’t realize at the time was, Erik Karlsson’s career IPP isn’t 35%. In fact it isn’t even close. Karlsson’s IPP in 2009-10 was 46%, 51% in 2010-11, and 56% in 2011-12, which works out to be 52% for his career. Meaning, when a goal is scored with him on the ice, more than half of the time he had a significant part in it happening. In a nutshell, that’s why he won the Norris.

On the PK

Despite winning a lot of draws in the defensive zone, the Senators penalty kill was absolutely brutal with Konopka on the ice. If you're having trouble reading the players numbers on the graph, you can blame Konopka for stretching hte y axis with his horrible play. Winchester was very good at killing penalties, so losing him is dissapointing. Fortunately, Jim O'Brien had almost identical numbers. I could see him being a guy the team relies for heavy minutes next season.

Hope you'll give him a warm welcome in the comments and a follow on twitter as he's a pretty funny dude.

…now if only we had a season to write about

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