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Alfie Speaks On Jim Rome

After scoring the climatic game-tying goal in the last minute of regulation on Sunday, Daniel Alfredsson made an appearance on the Jim Rome Show this afternoon. Having formed a bond from his time with the Los Angeles Kings organization, former Senators Team President Roy Mlakar made the occasional appearance when he was with the organization, but I honestly cannot remember the last time a player appeared in the Jungle. 

I have transcribed the appearance below, but if you want to stream the interview, you can do so here. If anything, you have to do it for the introduction where Alfie's poor telephone connection create some problems. 

"And Ottawa was like, 'Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!'" 

Will Alfie have a take and not suck, find out after the jump. 

On the game-tying goal and where it would rank for him in his career…

“It’s up there, there’s no question. I’m at the end of my career as well. It was almost as if I could see the season ending before my eyes at the end there. We were getting a penalty with a minute and a half left and being down by one (goal). But, there’s something about this team that we’ve been able to overcome tough situations all year long and we were able to come up with a couple of big plays with thirty seconds left to tie it and give ourselves a chance.”

On the play itself and being surprised that he got as good of a look as he did…

“I don’t know, it just happened so quick. I started the play carrying it up. I dropped it to Gonchar and then I kind of disappeared on the far side; seeing what’s going to happen. Gonchar made a great play out to Michalek on the far side and I was able to come through and I think both their forward and defenceman kind of forgot about me. (Michalek) throws a great pass to me and I was able to redirect it up high over the goalie. But, you don’t see that happen too often where you score a shorthanded goal when you’re down by one.”

On the Karlsson penalty late in the game and the mood on the bench…

“Well, it was sombre, there’s no question. But, you know we have nothing to lose. If we lose two or three to nothing, it doesn’t matter. We have to go for it and I think in Pittsburgh’s case, they know that, so they don’t really try to push forward on their power play. They try to play cautious with the puck and that ended up working to our advantage. We were able to take advantage of them being boxed up in the neutral zone with not a lot of speed. We were able to carry it up without too much trouble and be able to get a play at the net and fortunately for us, it worked out.”

On the tension of overtime hockey and being in that situation as a player…

“It was way better than when I was twenty than now when I’m 40. It is intense and usually, we always talk about the first three or four minutes of overtime is usually the most important time. Most goals are scored at that time or even at the end of the period, so (those are) crucial times. You always try to start well and then kind of hang on and don’t give anything easy to the other team. Usually it’s a bounce, a tip in or like in our case, a rebound that we pounce on and put in the net that decides overtime games.”

On the emotional and physical toll paid in a double-overtime game and the lift it gives when you win…

“Well, it gives the team a huge boost; especially doing it at home too. The crowd was really into it obviously when we tied it up. And then (when we) win it in overtime, they went crazy. A lot of emotions going through our team, but you’re on a high for a few hours. Fortunately, we have two days in between games here, which gives us time to physically regroup and mentally recharge because we won one game and it felt great, but we’re still down two-one in the series. Tomorrow’s game is going to be huge for us to really get back in the series.”

On the team’s confidence taking a hit beating Montreal and then dropping the first two games to Pittsburgh…

“It did a little bit, but I think we knew how to correct it because we kind of gave Pittsburgh a little bit too much respect. We’ve been a team that has kind of been making our own luck. We don’t rely on the other team to just make mistakes. We want to force mistakes and be aggressive. I don’t find that we were (doing) that in the first two games. We gave them a little too much time with the puck and they have so much skill from Crosby, Malkin, and Iginla to name a few that they are going to make you pay. We did a much better job in game three and going forward, they’re going to be a dangerous team tomorrow. We’re going to have to do an even better job.”

On the return of Jason Spezza and what it meant to the team…

“It gave us a lift in two different ways. It was a huge lift emotionally just to have him back. He’s the go-to guy for us offensively the last ten years, pretty much. And then on the ice, I think he takes pressure off of the other centers – Turris, Pageau and Zack Smith. He’s great in the faceoff circles – which we improved our stats from the previous two games. So overall it’s a big boost for us. He’s not one-hundred percent yet, but definitely a needed boost for us anyway he can get on the ice.”

On playing his entire career in Ottawa…

“Well, I believe I’ve been very fortunate. Not only to be with one team but to come to a city like Ottawa. I am originally from Gothenburg, Sweden and it’s very similar in size and peoples’ mentalities are very much the same. So I felt very comfortable from the beginning and also, I was with the team and we were struggling. I won the rookie of the year and kind of got a lot of attention. I’ve been the guy that has been here, like you said, seventeen seasons. Guys have been coming and going and I’ve kind of been the mainstay and it’s been a great ride, both on and off the ice. The support we get from the people in this city has been amazing as well, so I count myself as very fortunate.”

On wondering at any point what it might be like to play somewhere else…

“Of course I have. I have thought about it. Like you said, my career is like anybody else, there are ups and downs. But I’m still looking back and I’m very happy I haven’t gone anywhere and I’ve been able to stay here my whole career. It’s always tempting at times, but four or five years ago, I could have become a free agent and you think about the what ifs and what could happen. But, I’ve been here so long that it felt, ‘If I’m going to win the Cup, I want to do it here.’ That’s the relationship that I have with the city and the fans, and it didn’t really feel right. And I’m happy I made that decision as well.”

On what it would mean to win the Cup for Ottawa or it being taboo to talk about…

“No, I would love to, there’s no question. I think that’s the reason I’m still playing. I’ve given myself a chance here in the last two years, at the end of my career. This team, we were in a tough spot two or three years ago. We’ve turned it around and made the playoffs two years in a row here and going to the second round this year. We keep believing here. We know we’re in tough against a great Pittsburgh team, but we believe we can do it and to do that, we have to start by winning tomorrow night.”

On some of the teammates that he really admired and wanted to go to battle with…

“There’s a few. Zdeno Chara, who is now the captain of the Bruins, I admire him. He’s a guy who works extremely hard and Marian Hossa, same thing in Chicago – great work ethic. To go back to Chara though, I can’t really say that I enjoy going back to battle with him, but I admire him. There’s also a few other guys. Dany Heatley was here for a while. We had some great success – me, him and Spezza as well. There are quite a few guys that have been here and you look back and it’s fun to have been a part of their careers. I’ve learned a lot from them and hopefully I’ve been able to help them out as well. And then, you mentioned Roy (Mlakar) as well, to go back, one of the things that I’m really liked (for) is the charity work I do. And Roy was one of those guys who really taught me how I could give back to the community and he was instrumental to that and if he listens to this, thanks Roy.”

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